Office politics: You need to know these rules of the game

Politics does not only take place in parliaments and back rooms, but also between coffee machines, Jam and Sauce Filling Machine, and copiers in offices.

Office politics is a hot topic. In order to achieve your goals and turn your ideas into reality, you need the support of colleagues and superiors.

Rules of the game

Stay out of office politics

Unfortunately, political games and office gossip cannot be completely ignored. After all, they also offer one or the other advantage. For example, it never hurts if you learn early about an upcoming change in management or other changes that will directly influence your work and career via the “floor radio”.

Talk about your successes, but don’t show yourself off

Office politics and career planning cannot be clearly separated from one another. Even if you hate power games, you need to get other people’s attention to move forward. Often times, employees put a lot of effort, time, and creativity into their work but then fail to reap the benefits. You should therefore ensure that your performance is recognized and that your boss is always aware of your successes.

Do not blaspheme – not even after office hours. Network!

Gossip is probably the largest part of office politics. Only say what you would say to their face about colleagues. However, that does not mean that you shouldn’t hold small talks or stay away from social events with colleagues. A broad network is worth its weight in gold if you want to make progress in your job and stay up to date.

Distinguish between gossip and valuable news

While blasphemy rounds do not offer you any advantages, you should still keep your ears open when colleagues are chatting with each other. Sometimes you get such helpful news, for example, that an interesting position is becoming vacant or there are signs of restructuring.

Eliminate conflict

You will seldom agree with all your colleagues. But prevent smoldering disagreements from growing into major conflicts. After discussions, give yourself enough time to calm down, and then bring the topic up directly. Be honest but tactful, focus on the facts, not your feelings. The same is true if you made a mistake. Stand by it and correct the mishap immediately.

Avoid gossip but seek small talk

Be friendly and interested. Small talk is more important than many employees think. Of course, you will not get anywhere without talent and hard work. But social skills are playing an increasingly important role.